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Opinion: Fighting inflation is a tough job

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Want to sign up to be an inflation fighter? Don’t think it’s just something for the Fed, Congress, and big business to do? It’s like...

Opinion: Off with their heads, she said

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Once again, an Indiana politician has made national news.

Ryan Trares: Soccer experience has been a win

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The first season was a success.

Opinion: Let me sleep on it

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I recently got tested to see if I had sleep apnea. Sleep disorders can be serious, but my overnight stay in a “sleep lab,” had a few lighter moments.

Opinion: Lessons to learn from dandelions

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One of the tenets of Buddhism is that human beings find life frustrating because we see problems where no problems exist. I was reminded of this bit of wisdom as my wife and I faced our annual springtime ritual of pulling weeds and digging up unwanted tree saplings from the garden and yard.

Opinion: Immigration and inflation

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There are three numbers I’d like you to keep track of as you read this column: 11.3 million, 6 million, and 1.6 million. The 11.3 million is the number of job openings in this county. The 6 million is the number of unemployed in the United States, and the 1.6 million represents the number of attempted illegal border crossings.

Opinion: Jan. 6 committees feels storytelling pressure

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I have felt for the longest time that America has begun to feel like a never-ending reenactment of Monty Python’s classic sketch, “The Argument Clinic.” The premise of the 1970 sketch is that there might actually be people who are simply looking for an argument and are willing to pay a pro to deliver one. Michael Palin and John Cleese expertly show how frustrating a so-called argument can be when contradiction is its only feature. First of all, the sketch is hilarious, but importantly today, it foreshadowed social media and contemporary politics 50 years ahead of its time.

Opinion: Bipartisanship isn’t dead, but it’s not in good health, either

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Having just watched a Supreme Court nominee supported by a comfortable majority of Americans draw just three Republican votes in the Senate, you could be forgiven for thinking bipartisanship in Congress is a thing of the past. And in the case of Supreme Court nominees, you’d be right: The last time a nominee got over half the votes of the opposition party was in 2005, and you have to go back nearly three decades—to Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 1993—to find one who drew votes from almost all senators.